Category Archives: Experience

Journey with Network Chiropractic Care

Have you heard of network chiropractic care?  If you answered, “no”, you are likely not alone.

Network Chiropractic Care, otherwise known as Network Spinal Analysis (NSA), is a gentle touch approach that nurtures the nervous system.  The emphasis on a reset is multi-faceted across physiological and mental/emotional health.

The intervention occurs through spinal cord adjustments that support a re-organization of the tension within the nervous system.  Its aim is to shift out of a stress-based state towards more optimal functionality.  A more thorough synthesis is provided on Daocloud HERE.

It is EXTREMELY important to consider the health of your nervous system.  The nervous system is tied into so many other areas including hormonal regulation, detoxification pathways, and digestive health, then, of course, the brain!

I had been passively looking for a chiropractor with a focus on gentle applications.  Admittedly, I had been doing just about everything else for good health, but keeping this type of treatment on the back-burner.  Until recently, I didn’t realize that the gentle approach that I was looking for would equate to NSA.  However, upon the introduction, I was immediately drawn to the concept.

In the Functional Medicine community, we frequently talk about neurology and respective tie-ins to overall health.  The nervous system (or systems, because there are different components to the master system) is a foundational system imperative for both structural health and overall well-being, yet may be under-emphasized in personal approaches to wellness.

In February of this year (2019), I started my journey with Network Chiropractic Care.  The timing was a little off due to some pre-established travel plans, but like with anything in life, there never really is a perfect time and sometimes we just need to dive in.

I wasn’t expecting favorable results from my initial scan, but I was also surprised at how much tension I was actually carrying.  Therefore, after wrapping up my travel, I returned in March to enroll in a 3-month intensive.  (The specific practice I enrolled can be accessed HERE).

At this point, I’m a few weeks into my care plan.  It will be an exciting update down the road upon completion of the intensive.  However, for now, a few initial observations are as follows;

  • Most of the applications are very, very light in touch.  It’s is nothing like getting a massage.  However, it is amazing how relaxed your muscles feel after a session.
  • For now, I’m still dealing with tension and tightness that returns, sometimes in little as a few hours to a day after a session, but, so far, the treatments have made me MUCH more aware of how I engage with my body.  Operating in a subconscious, auto-pilot sort of way, I have realized how often I have been twisting and contorting throughout the day and evening, particularly around the shoulder and upper back area.
  • The relationship between neurology and breathing is even more clear.  I have been aware of this mind-body connection area for quite some time.  It appears in so many healing modalities from meditation to yoga to visual frameworks, such as guided imagery.  However, in the NSA framework, you really feel it.  A minor touch on a specific point can almost immediately shift your breath.  I would like to think this is a release within the body and further demonstration of what is working.  To be continued…

I would love to share more about my journey with Network Chiropractic Care.  Please don’t hesitate to reach out to me to learn more about the experiences and insights I have had thus far.

In the meantime, a few additional resources are below;

New Day Network Wellness

Information on Daocloud

Family Network Chiropractic, About NSA™, Network Spinal Analysis

A free directory of providers

Epienergetics website

 

*Photo by Stuart Poulton on Unsplash

What About Vermont?

The Green Mountain State may just live up to it’s “green” status and perhaps there is a little bit of truth to Keep Vermont Weird as well.

In mid-October, I visited this lovely state.  It was just as the leaves were starting to change in color.  Therefore, I saw plenty of green with some pleasant pops of red, yellow, and orange as well.

My decision to take the trip was, ultimately, the result of two state-wide campaigns that went viral about mid-2018.  One, a grant-funded remote-worker relocation incentive program that was passed by their state legislature and, two, a tourism campaign referred to as Stay-to-Stay which invited people to visit Vermont with the consideration of relocation and included a schedule of events centered around leading a life there.

In a nutshell, I just had to see about Vermont…

As a long-standing practitioner of green living, I have always been curious about things I had heard with regards to life in Vermont.  Perhaps this has been partly a picturesque pipe dream of becoming a homesteader paired with another part desire to “get out of dodge”, however, it continued to stick in the back of my mind for some years.  When I learned of the two programs, the notion re-emerged to top of mind and I simply could not let the thought pass without taking action.

I spent most of my time in the Burlington area.  Coming from living primarily in a major urban environment, I felt it would give me a good sample of Vermont while also keeping a bit of an urban feel.  (When I return to Vermont, I would also really like to visit the Rutland area).

So what did I learn from visiting this unique place?

There are many facets I could comment on, but the ones that stood out the most include the following:

Smaller sized population areas do NOT need to impede larger scale support for farmers markets and locally sourced food.

In fact, the Burlington Farmers Market, which is not the only one in Burlington, but is the most well known, could just about give Pike Place Market in Seattle a run for their money.  There is so much enthusiasm for “Vermont made” and many options are organic and/or sustainable.  Also, in the main center of Burlington, no big-box grocers reside.  The primary grocery shopping center is a neighborhood co-op, City Market, Onion River Co-op.

Luck had it that a fellow alumni from where I received my undergraduate and Master of Business Administration degrees worked in leadership for this co-op and was willing to meet me.  His enthusiasm for the place was invigorating.  Also, he shared some impressive data points that reflect just how much Vermont seems to throw support towards local growers.

Social impact and business can co-exist… really, they can.

This theme was salient across my time there.  From the presentations at Vermont Tech Jam, a meeting with a hybrid co-working/business accelerator space, VCET, to casual conversations with business owners residing there, it was evident that this is a priority.

“Vermonters”, be they those raised there or transplanted, seem to have strived to work sufficient and smart, yet not lose consciousness for the communities in which they operate and service.  This is further illustrated by the number of Certified B Corporations there.

I gained a sense of small but mighty from the business community there.  Successes originating and/or operating within Vermont, such as Jet Blue, Seventh Generation, Gardener’s Supply Company, Mamava, and Sustain Natural, only add to the tout that business can behave better, even if just a little.

Green and healthful living can be practiced on a regular basis anywhere, but a few small yet supportive infrastructures may help us to be mindful of doing so.

Perhaps it was the air of the place (pun intended), but there were certainly signs for support of health promotion.  Even subtle reminders, such as attractive light pole banners reading “Smoke-free community” within areas where people work out and play outdoors were noticeable and seemed to be well-respected.  More information in these links; Church Street, Burlington Parks

There were also consistent reminders to take the idea of a socially-supportive community into consideration.  The lake monster themed change stands in downtown Burlington, for example, were fun and artistic but served a relevant charitable purpose.

It was also very easy to find recycling, which, believe it or not (…in 2018!), some municipalities still fail at royally!

Yoga really does help fuel the body, mind, and soul.

I was blown away by the number of yoga studios and the quality of instruction I received.  Many private studios offer a range of classes and most include some sort of donation based class at least once a week with a charitable beneficiary designated.

Spaces calling themselves wellness co-ops or collectives housed an interdisciplinary range of allied health, wellness, and fitness professionals.  These centers and shared spaces reflected both a mutual support for one another in business and presented convenience which seemed more patient-centric and nurturing by design.  Some of them centered on social services.  Almost all of them included a range of holistic services, including various yoga modalities and therapy.

Not to mention, this state has thrown their hat in the ring to support integrative healthcare, for example, naturopathic physicians (NMD’s) can operate as PCP’s (primary care physicians).  In addition, as compared to other states in the U.S., Vermont policy is more supportive for the range of nutrition-related professionals.

In closing…

I came back feeling a little more fresh and cleaner.  The landscape was spectacular.  With the scenic beauty and crisp “mountain air,” it’s hard to imagine not feeling a little more well after spending time there.

Vermont, like any state, is certainly imperfect.  However, I have little doubt that the sense of community and cultural norms centered around green space, healthful living, and social-consciousness in Vermont have kept this a really, really great place to not just visit, but also live, work, or play!

For a little fun, more Vermont slogans available here.

I also would like to give a special nod to the yoga apparel store Yogarama Athletica.  If in Burlington, it is definitely worth stopping in.

Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

Reasons to Get to Know your Local Farms

#ShopLocal represents a bit of a movement for many reasons…  supporting local economies, helping small businesses and entrepreneurs, and enjoying specific, regional options are a few of those.  When it comes to nutrition, it can also equate to greater transparency, produce picked at peak ripeness, reducing an urban footprint, and some regional health benefit, such as honey that is more likely to support a reduction in allergy symptoms related to a local area.

It’s also a personalized experience! 

A recent trip to a local grower, Wauka Meadows Farm, near the area my mother retired to introduced a new food (for my knowledge) that carries a nutritional punch, the muscadine grape (pictured above).  It also led to a healthful discussion with one of the owners with regards to local produce, the growing environment and regional climate, and some barn kittens running around the property.  Having the ability to speak directly with the owners is a fantastic opportunity for places such as this.  It also allows us to vote with our consumer dollar which for transitional farming areas may be quite impactful.  Finally, you may just meet a local billy goat who relishes the idea of your attention!

*Livestrong.com provides a write up on muscadine grapes HERE.

*Find sustainable and organic farms in the North and Central Georgia area via Northeast Georgia Locally Grown CSA (community supported agriculture) program.