Tag Archives: stress

A Wellness Journal for Your Best, Healthy Life

A wellness journal can be important in achieving your goals.

The use of a journal can help to Clear the mind, allow for Self-reflection and Emotional expression, Provide accountability, Reduce stress, and improve overall Problem-solving.  It can be supportive of personal growth and may lead to a greater sense of empowerment in one’s life.

It is also considered an inexpensive form of self-care!

Writing therapy with the use of a journal has been used in a range of scenarios related to overall health and wellness.  Essentially what can make journaling supportive to health is when it is leveraged in a concerted way.  More on this can be found through PositivePsychology.com under “writing therapy”.  Also, a brief synopsis on the history of journal writing as a form of therapy is available from the Center for Journal Therapy.

In scientific studies, various associations between creative expression and health outcomes have been observed.

Self-reflection exercises, such as those that can be applied through the use of a journal, have been used to support people in overcoming grief or trauma.  The rationale behind this is that expressive writing can help people to acknowledge traumatic events, organize thoughts, and, then, help them to make sense of things.  Essentially, it is a way to learn from the experience and move forward.  Experts in this area point out the need to find the right amount of time spent on journaling vs. over-reliance on the tool which could result in rumination.

Studies that have focused on people with chronic health conditions have shown improvements in overall well-being even if the act of journaling was only once a week.  Furthermore, there has been some evidence to suggest the simple act of using a journal can boost the immune system and, therefore, benefit health overall.  This could have been a bi-product resulting from stress reduction.

Improving immune health is especially relevant when health conditions have been diagnosed.  

For general wellness and personal growth, journals can be used to create healthy habits.  A few ways in which a journal is supportive for goal setting and forming habits include;

  • Definition and visualization of goals
  • Organization of information and supportive details
  • A catalyst to plan necessary steps and your time
  • Leverage of self-accountability and check-ins

Furthermore, the use of a journal can be a great way to notice patterns in your behavior and possible triggers that throw you off track.

When incorporating health and wellness into your journal, you can also use sections to monitor Food and Water intake, Sleep or fatigue, Exercise, Self-care, and factors or symptoms associated with a health condition.

Using a wellness journal is not only a good way to plan out your favorite healthy activities, but also to draft and track other personal goals, such as those related to Productivity, Altruism or Volunteerism, and/or Relationships.

In my wellness practice, I leverage a symptoms journal approach that also incorporates factors related to well-being.  It never ceases to amaze me how quickly participants will notice something they hadn’t before completing the journaling exercise.  Recently, I added a simple journal tool for general health and wellness.  It is conveniently named Live Your Best, Healthy Life!

Photo credit(s):  Wellness Stock Shop

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

In need of formalized support to make healthful lifestyle changes?  Contact me through my business site.

Sources:

Ackerman, C.E.  (2019, Nov 20).  Writing Therapy:  Using a Pen and Paper to Enhance Personal Growth.  PositivePsychology.com.  Retrieved from https://positivepsychology.com/writing-therapy/.

Baikie, K.A. and Wilhelm, K.  (2005, Sep).  Emotional and Physical Health Benefits of Expressive Writing.  Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 11(5), 338-346.

Center for Journal Therapy  (n.d.).  A Brief History of Journal Writing.  Retrieved from https://journaltherapy.com/get-training/short-program-journal-to-the-self/journal-to-the-self/journal-writing-history/.

Murray, B.  (2002, Jun).  Writing to Heal:  By Helping People Manage and Learn from Negative Experiences, Writing Strengthens Their Immune Systems As Well As Their Minds.  American Psychological Association, Monitor on Psychology, 33(6), 54.

O’Connor, M.  (n.d.).  Evidence of the Healing Power of Expressive Writing.  The Foundation for Art and Healing, The UnLonely Project.  Retrieved from https://artandhealing.org/evidence-of-the-healing-power-of-expressive-writing/.

Pennebaker, J. W. and Smyth, J.M.  (2016).  Opening Up by Writing it Down:  How Expressive Writing Improves Health and Eases Emotional Pain, (3rd edition), New York, NY:  The Guilford Press.

Smyth, J.M., Stone, A.A., Hurewitz, A., and Kaell, A.  (1999, Apr 14).  Effects of Writing About Stressful Experiences on Symptom Reduction in Patients with Asthma or Rheumatoid Arthritis:  A Randomized Trial.  Journal of American Medical Association, 281(14), 1304-09.

  1. Time to reflect, write and create. The Happy Planner®️ Guided Journal with help you take a look into who you are, where you want to go and goals you want to achieve!

What Are Superfoods and How Can They Help You

You may be hearing about “new superfoods” this year.

What does this mean and how can you fit this information into a realistic plan for health and wellness?  (Hint, see below for 3 tried and true tips).

Essentially the term “superfood” is not necessarily one that is scientific but may still be relevant to consider with identifying food sources that are packed with nutrients.

“Superfood” is indicative of a food source and the compounds within it that have been linked to certain health benefits or the prevention of adverse health conditions.  Many of these foods are derived from plant-based sources, although not all.

You will likely hear about the power of these foods concerning a range of health topics including, but not limited to the following:

  • weight loss
  • reversing or preventing cognitive impairments and our overall brain health
  • help in mental and emotional wellness, such as conditions like depression
  • overall health of the gut
  • stress reduction

The health benefits from these foods may include reducing excess inflammation and adverse oxidative stress which are two key factors involved in the discussion of chronic health conditions.  This is also a key reason for the emphasis on these “superfoods” when it comes to your health outcomes.

It seems that each year there is a new list of hot topic food options that can apply to your health and wellness but may also be trendy and, therefore, will show up in restaurants or product offerings.  This is not necessarily a bad thing, but something to be aware of as an empowered health consumer.

So, what are a few of these “2020 superfoods” that you may be hearing more about this year?

In somewhat of a continuation from recent years past, you will be hearing and learning more about fermented foods, seaweeds and algae, and seeds that are both edible and carry significant nutritional benefits.  Furthermore, food sources that may aid in your digestive health such as those with prebiotics, fiber, or digestive bitters.

A term that you may hear and could be new to you is “nervines” which are adaptogenic herbs supportive of your nervous system or are “neuroprotective”.  Nervines can also influence hormone regulation so can be important in many health-related conditions.  Also, these food sources may be good to include in your health plan for approaches to stress.

One of my all-time favorite companies for herbs, spices, teas, and essential oils is Mountain Rose Herbs.  They break down Understanding Nervines and Adaptogens in their blog.  Furthermore, Healthline, a leading source for consumer information related to health and wellness, also provides an overview of Adaptogenic Herbs.

Then, of course, there are the tried and true options such as berries, avocados, beets, dark leafy greens and microgreens, mushrooms, and fatty fish like salmon or sardines.  An important attribute to many of these foods is the rich pigments (i.e. color) of the food.  In natural foods, color is often indicative of nutrients critical to human health.

So how can you make sense of the term “superfood” used in media and marketing?

According to the leading global consulting firm, Accenture, consumers are changing to be more health-conscious and aware.  Also, the emphasis on personalized approaches to diet and nutrition is growing.

As a health and wellness professional myself, it is an exciting trend to observe.  Yet, it is also one to monitor for quality and overall relevance of the information.  As alluded to above, there is an intersect of science and marketing with the term “superfood”.  However, there are certainly ways to remain clued in and empowered as a health consumer.

In closing, 3 simple, tried and true approaches to include superfoods in your health and wellness are:

  • Eat colorful foods in variety
  • Incorporate nutrient-dense foods into snacking
  • Include herbs and spices in food preparation and cooking

If you simply start with and focus on these 3 tactics, you will undoubtedly be at an advantage when it comes to living most healthful and well.

Photo credit(s):  Ella Olsson on Unsplash

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

In need of formalized support to make healthful lifestyle changes?  Contact me through my business site.

Prioritizing Your Health and Finances To Get The Most Out of Life

Taking care of yourself, including both health and finances, is a sure-fire way to cultivate various positive aspects of your life.  Financial health is a critical element within self-care.  A positive stance for financial wellness can expand your abilities, contributions, and impact you have on others.

There are a fair amount of psycho- and sociological factors and, often, stigmas around making financial decisions that can be rather entangled.  Regardless, mental, physical, and financial health are inextricably linked.  Therefore, it’s worth placing focus on this area as part of a proactive approach to leading an overall healthful life.

Financial worry can set off a cascade of challenges.

In many people, it can lead to chronic stress which, furthermore, can impair sleep, lead to greater levels of anxiety or states of depression, may influence self-esteem, and could trigger less healthful behaviors.  Furthermore, psychological distress and negative emotions may indirectly contribute to increased inflammation in the body, higher blood pressure, and the onset of other chronic health conditions.

Financial stress could even inhibit seeking out appropriate care in the first place.  According to the American Psychological Association, the cost of health care is a leading concern and cause for stress (2019).

Essentially, financial stress can be disruptive in nature.  However, there are facets that can help the mental-emotional relationship to finances.  Like any other aspect of life and goal-setting, expectations should be realistic.  It may also be beneficial to take self-inventory for how you make decisions.

One review of five studies suggested that “affective decision-makers” may be more likely to avoid making decisions related to financial matters.  This was due, in part, to the perception that decisions related to finances are very analytical in nature.  Affective thinking has lent towards having a distinct sense of feeling or emotion present when making decisions.  Affective decision-makers may have considered financial decisions “cold” in nature and, therefore, less relatable.  Furthermore, the complexities of financial products and instruments could have been intimidating (Park and Sela, 2017).

It is not to assume that affective thinking is inefficient and absolutely leads to a less proactive approach to finances, but it could be important to understand where you fall on the spectrum in case this is a mediating factor.

Ignoring your finances can create more money problems and increase the resulting stress.  Acknowledging and accepting any negative feelings you may have about dealing with your money is a critical step.

Other areas that studies have shown to be influential include the following:

  • one’s social environment and/or level of emotional support
  • relationships and social standings within communities
  • previous experiences with financial stressors

According to Gallup-Sharecare, five essential elements of well-being include:

  • sense of purpose, including within a career path
  • social relationships
  • financial security
  • relationship to community
  • physical health

Furthermore, they have defined “financial” as managing your economic life to reduce stress and increase security.

Like with any big challenge, breaking out small, actionable steps and a clear timeline can be beneficial.  Working with appropriate professionals, including both those with financial expertise and emotional health resources (or therapeutic options), can help to refine your perspective and address any blocks in the mindset.

As experts will point out, this area is complex and laced with emotional drivers.  There is also a difference between knowing what to do and understanding how to do it.

Not all support options have to cost an arm and a leg.

Many cities and towns have finance-related programs through their city/public affairs divisions or library systems.  Meanwhile, a hack to mental health is seeing a psychologist in training who will be under supervision but have more nominal fees.

Although exact financial circumstances will vary from person to person.  Taking steps to ensure financial behaviors are healthful can help to reduce mental fog from financial stress and, therefore, lead to a greater level of productivity.  It can help you move forward and feel more positive about what’s to come in life.

Photo credit(s):  Fabian Blank on Unsplash

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

In need of formalized support to make healthful lifestyle changes?  Contact me through my business site.

References:

American Psychological Association (Nov, 2019).  Stress in America 2019.  Retrieved from https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2019/stress-america-2019.pdf.

American Psychological Association (2015, Feb 4).  Stress in America, Paying with our Health.  Retrieved from https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2014/stress-report.pdf.

Connolly, M. and Slade, M. (2019, May 7).  The United States of Stress 2019, Special Report.  Everyday Health.  Retrieved from https://www.everydayhealth.com/wellness/united-states-of-stress/.

Gallup-Sharecare Well-being Index (2017).  State of American Well-being, 2017 State Well-being Rankings.  Retrieved from https://wellbeingindex.sharecare.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Gallup-Sharecare-State-of-American-Well-Being_2017-State-Rankings_FINAL.pdf.

Park, J.J. and Sela, A. (2018, Aug).  Not My Type:  Why Affective Decision Makers Are Reluctant to Make Financial Decisions.  Journal of Consumer Research, 45(2), 298-319.

Sturgeon, J.A., et al.  (2016).  The Psychosocial Context of Financial Stress:  Implications for Inflammation and Psychological Health.  Psychosomatic Medicine, 78(2), 134-143.